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New Jersey's #1 Provider of Turn-Key Income Properties

New Jersey

At the forefront of our investment regions is New Jersey. New Jersey is the leading state mortgage delinquencies in all of US, and densely populated with 1.7M detached, single-family homes. Of those, 365,466 properties are in pre-foreclosure along with a huge hub for individuals that work in NYC and need easy access to mass transit, making it a suitable real estate target.

We operate primarily in B class neighborhoods such as Hamilton, Ewing, Willingboro, Elizabeth, and Plainfield. For investors looking for more aggressive (and higher risk) investments, we have opportunities in Trenton.

Trenton

GEOGRAPHY AND DEMOGRAPHICS: The North Ward, once a mecca for the city’s middle class, is home to a large Polish American neighborhood that borders Lawrence Township and still retains many important architectural and historic sites. The South Ward is the most diverse neighborhood in Trenton and is home to many Latin American, Italian-American, and African American residents. The East Ward is the smallest neighborhood in Trenton and is home to the Trenton Transit Center and Trenton Central High School.

INDUSTRIES AND EMPLOYMENT: Trenton was a major manufacturing center in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Along with many other United States cities in the 1970s, Trenton fell on hard times when manufacturing and industrial jobs declined. Concurrently, state government agencies began leasing office space in the surrounding suburbs. Today, Trenton’s biggest employer is still the state of New Jersey. Each weekday, 20,000 state workers flood into the city from the surrounding suburbs.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: Public transportation within the city and to/from its nearby suburbs is provided in the form of local bus routes run by New Jersey Transit. SEPTA also provides bus service to adjacent Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The Trenton Transit Center, located on the heavily traveled Northeast Corridor, serves as the northbound terminus for SEPTA’s Trenton Line (local train service to Philadelphia) and southbound terminus for New Jersey Transit’s Northeast Corridor Line (local train service to Penn Station New York). The train station also serves as the northbound terminus for the River Line; a diesel light rail line that runs to Camden.

Elizabeth

GEOGRAPHY AND DEMOGRAPHICS: The city of Elizabeth has several distinct districts and neighborhoods. Midtown also occasionally known as Uptown, is the main commercial district and a historic section as well. Bayway is located in the southern part of the City and borders the City of Linden and has maintained a strong Polish community for years. Downtown and Elizabeth port is the oldest neighborhood in Elizabeth and perhaps the most diverse place in the City. Elmora is a middle/working-class neighborhood in the western part of Elizabeth.

INDUSTRIES AND EMPLOYMENT: Since World War II, Elizabeth has seen its transportation facilities grow; the Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal is one of the busiest ports in the world, as is Newark Liberty International Airport, parts of which are actually in Elizabeth. Elizabeth also features Little Jimmy’s Italian Ices (since 1932), the popular Jersey Gardens outlet mall, Loews Theater, and the Elizabeth Center, which generate millions of dollars in revenue. Companies based in Elizabeth include New England Motor Freight.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: Elizabeth is among the U.S. cities with the highest train ridership. It is serviced by New Jer-sey Transit on Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor Line. There are two stations in Elizabeth. Eliza-beth station, also called Broad Street Elizabeth or Midtown Station, is the southern station in Midtown Elizabeth. The other train station in Elizabeth is North Elizabeth station. New Jersey Transit is planning a segment of the Newark-Elizabeth Rail Link (NERL), des-ignated as the Union County Light Rail (UCLR). The UCLR is planned to connect Midtown Station with Newark Liberty International Airport and have seven or eight other stations in between within Elizabeth city limits.

Plainfield aka “The Queen City”

GEOGRAPHY AND DEMOGRAPHICS: The city is located in Central Jersey on the southwestern edge of Union County and is bordered by nine municipalities. Scotch Plains lies to the north and east, and Fanwood to the northeast. Bordered to the south are South Plainfield, and Piscataway. To the southwest lies Dunellen and to the southeast, Edison. All which are in Middlesex County. The racial makeup of the city was 23.54% (11,724) White, 50.20% (25,006) Black or African American, Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 40.37% (20,105) of the population.

INDUSTRIES AND EMPLOYMENT: The top industry in Plainfield’s Union County is the Offices of Physicians industry with 1.8% of all workers in Plainfield employed in this sector. Other leading employment sectors for Plainfield include supermarkets, Home Health Care Services, and Corporate, Subsidiary and Regional Managing Offices. There are 60,858 business establishments in Plainfield’s Union County with fewer than 10 employees, which is a good indicator of the entrepreneurship in the community.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: Plainfield has two New Jersey Transit rail stations on the Raritan Valley Line, formerly the mainline of the Central Railroad of New Jersey. The main Plainfield station is in the downtown and a second, smaller Netherwood station is in the Netherwood section, east of downtown and within a mile of the Fanwood border. The New Brunswick train station is approx-imately 15 minutes away.

Willingboro

Their town motto? “A Naturally Better Place To Be”

GEOGRAPHY AND DEMOGRAPHICS: According to the United States Census Bureau, Willingboro township had a total area of 8.150 square miles, including 7.738 square miles of land and 0.412 square miles of water (5.05%).The township borders the Burlington County municipalities of Edgewater Park Township, Burlington Township, Westampton Township, Mount Laurel Township, Moorestown Township, Delran Township, and Delanco Township. As of 2010, Willingboro has a large population of African, AfroCaribbean, and Latino immigrants. The African community mostly consists of Liberians, Nigerians, Sierra Leoneans, as well as other West Africans. The Afro-Caribbean population mainly consists of Haitians, Jamaicans, Trinidadians, and Guyanese. The Latino population mainly consists of Dominicans, Puerto Ricans, Colombians, Hondurans, and Salvadorans. Many of these immigrants have moved from New York City, Newark, Jersey City, Trenton, and Philadelphia

INDUSTRIES AND EMPLOYMENT: Over the past year, the unemployment rate has decreased by 1.9 percentage points (-24.10%), meaning Willingboro’s unemployment conditions have significantly improved from their rate one year ago of 7.9%.The unemployment rate has not changed from one month ago, while the rest of New Jersey is on a general uptrend over the past month of 0.1%.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: New Jersey Transit provides bus service on 409 / 417 / 418 routes between Trenton and Philadelphia. BurLink bus service is offered on the B1 route (between Beverly and Pemberton) and on the B2 route (between Beverly and Westampton Township). Academy Bus provides service from Willingboro and at the park-and-ride facility near Exit 5 of the New Jersey Turnpike in Westampton to the Port Authority Bus Terminal and other street service in Midtown Manhattan and to both Jersey City and the Wall Street area in Lower Manhattan

Ewing

GEOGRAPHY AND DEMOGRAPHICS: Ewing Township is a township in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township’s population was 35,790, reflecting an increase of 83 (+0.2%) from the 35,707 counted in the 2000 Census, which had increased by 1,522 (+4.5%) from the 34,185 counted in the 1990 Census. The racial makeup of the township was 63.14% (22,598) White, 27.62% (9,885) Black or African American, 0.30% (109) Native American, 4.30% (1,538) Asian, 0.04% (15) Pacific Islander, 2.24% (803) from other races, and 2.35% (842) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.62% (2,727) of the population.

INDUSTRIES AND EMPLOYMENT: The companies offering the most jobs in Ewing, NJ are Cowan Systems, McDonalds and George Hildebrandt, Inc. Full-time jobs are the most common openings. Unemployment is down 1.4% in 2016 as opposed to 2015 in the county as according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the current unemployment percentage is 5.5%. Average weekly wage in the area is $1327 as reported in that same census.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: The West Trenton Station is at the terminus of SEPTA’s West Trenton Line. This commuter rail facility mainly serves commuter traffic to and from Philadelphia. New Jersey Transit has proposed a new West Trenton Line of its own, that would stretch for 27 miles (43 km) from the West Trenton Station to a connection with the Raritan Valley Line at Bridgewater Township, and from there to Newark Penn Station in Newark. Ewing Township is also traversed by the Delaware and Raritan Canal near the Delaware River. New Jersey Transit provides service between the township and Trenton on the 601, 602, 607, 608 and 609 routes.

Florence

Florence, New Jersey

GEOGRAPHY AND DEMOGRAPHICS: The township borders Bordentown Township, Burlington Township, Mansfield Township, Springfield Township in Burlington County; and Bristol Township, Falls Township and Tullytown across the Delaware River in Pennsylvania. The racial makeup of the township was 78.43% (9,497) White, 12.23% (1,481) Black or African American, 0.19% (23) Native American, 5.04% (610) Asian, 0.06% (7) Pacific Islander, 1.00% (121) from other races, and 3.06% (370) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.76% (576) of the population.

INDUSTRIES AND EMPLOYMENT: Florence is a really hot real estate market and is home to several major warehouses and distribution centers. Most recently, Amazon opened a new distribution center that brought on 2000 new jobs to the area. These employees will need houses to rent and that means that properties here will be tenanted very quickly. And Florence, soon to be the newest node on Amazon.com’s distribution grid, finds itself well-situated, indeed.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: The New Jersey Transit River Line light rail system offers service in the township at Florence station at U.S. Route 130 and Roebling station at Hornberger Avenue providing southbound service to Camden and the Walter Rand Transportation Center (with transfers available to the PATCO Speedline) and northbound service to the Trenton Rail Station with connections to New Jersey Transit trains to New York City, SEPTA trains to Philadelphia, and Amtrak trains on the Northeast Corridor. New Jersey Transit provides bus service on the 409 route between Trenton and Philadelphia.

Hamilton

GEOGRAPHY AND DEMOGRAPHICS: At the 2010 United States Census, there were 88,464 people, 34,534 households, and 23,759 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,240.2 per square mile (864.9/km2). There were 36,170 housing units at an average density of 915.9 per square mile (353.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 78.38% (69,340) White, 11.78% (10,419) Black or African American, 0.17% (149) Native American, 3.29% (2,914) Asian, 0.09% (79) Pacific Islander, 4.27% (3,775) from other races, and 2.02% (1,788) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.87% (9,613) of the population.

INDUSTRIES AND EMPLOYMENT: As of October 2016, significant construction has been done to further build up the Hamilton Township area. Multiple new retirement communities have been constructed, as well as multiple new restaurants, banks, gas stations and convenience stores along Route 33. Hamilton Township continues to expand rapidly to accommodate the increase in citizens residing in the community. Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital is a highly respected source of care in the state. It is situated next to where most of the underdeveloped land in the township used to be, land that is now home to the active older adult communities.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: With the addition of the modern Hamilton train station located on Sloan Avenue just off I-295 at Exit 65B, the township has attracted more New York City-based commuters to the area. The station offers service on New Jersey Transit’s Northeast Corridor Line to New York Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and to Trenton station where there is a SEPTA Trenton Line Regional Rail service to and from Philadelphia.

Burlington

Burlington, NJ

GEOGRAPHY AND DEMOGRAPHICS: Burlington borders Burlington Township in Burlington County and both Bristol and Bristol Township across the Delaware River in Pennsylvania. The Burlington-Bristol Bridge crosses the Delaware River, connecting Burlington to Bristol. At the 2010 United States Census, there were 9,920 people, 3,858 households, and 2,438 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,239.1 per square mile (1,250.6/km2). There were 4,223 housing units at an average density of 1,378.9 per square mile (532.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 58.92% (5,845) White, 32.98% (3,272) Black or African American, 0.18% (18) Native American, 2.03% (201) Asian, 0.04% (4) Pacific Islander, 2.29% (227) from other races, and 3.56% (353) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.50% (645) of the population.

INDUSTRIES AND EMPLOYMENT: Retail trade, a component of Burlington County’s largest employment sector, averaged the most hires  (2,201) in 2014. Just slightly behind it is the Health Care and Social Assistance industry with 2,021 hires in the same year. Other prominent industries that are right behind the top two are Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services (1,969), the Accommodation and Food Services (1,707), and Finance and Insurance (1,197). The diverse employment ecosystem makes Burlington resilient against a singular industry collapse.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: New Jersey Transit provides bus service in the city between Trenton and Philadelphia on the 409 and 418 routes and between Burlington and Camden on the 413 and 419 routes. The New Jersey Transit River Line light rail system provides transportation between the Trenton Transit Center in Trenton and the Walter Rand Transportation Center (and other stations) in Camden, with stops at Burlington South and Burlington Towne Centre.

Beverly

Beverly, NJ

GEOGRAPHY AND DEMOGRAPHICS: Beverly borders Edgewater Park Township, Delanco Township and Bensalem Township, Pennsylvania across the Delaware River. At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,577 people, 1,002 households, and 671.3 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,645.4 per square mile (1,793.6/km2). There were 1,086 housing units at an average density of 1,957.7 per square mile (755.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 61.66% (1,589) White, 29.88% (770) Black or African American, 0.16% (4) Native American, 0.78% (20) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.68% (69) from other races, and 4.85% (125) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.16% (236) of the population.

INDUSTRIES AND EMPLOYMENT: With Beverly being right on the border with Pennsylvania, and strategically located between Trenton and Philadelphia a multitudes of industries are open to residents of this quaint little town. This includes opening up the doors in sectors such as in education, manufacturing, oil refining, food processing, health care, telecommunications, financial services, and even some biotechnologies. Beverly is a well located town with a great deal of opportunity.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: The Beverly-Edgewater Park station provides service between the Trenton Transit Center in Trenton and the Walter Rand Transportation Center (and other stops) in Camden on New Jersey Transit’s River Line light rail system. New Jersey Transit provides bus service on route 419 between Burlington and Camden. BurLink bus service is offered on the B1 route (between Beverly and Pemberton) and on the B2 route (between Beverly and Westampton Township).

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